2009-01-03

Jasmine: chemistry of smell II



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Image - illustrates that indole is found in jasmine buds in a binded form releasing after the opening of the flowers.

Of course I was joking when promising to describe all of more than 300 constituents of the jasmine fragrance in detail. Nobody would be interested in a boring list of chemicals. Only experienced perfumers might find some fun in going through all those materials searching for some new solutions for the jasmine formulas. But the components I have described previously are already giving a good view on the chemistry of the jasmine fragrance. But perfumery didn’t stay still since 1912 and it might be interesting to mention some more compounds of jasmine absolute discovered since than.

First of all it’s interesting to notice that the chromatographic analyse data vary and sometimes show the significant dispersion. For example, the content of benzyl acetate may vary from 2% to 30% (and never reaches the 65% mentioned in a formula from 1912); linalool varies from traces to 9%. Other compounds may also vary depending on the variety of jasmine, place of growth, harvest, method of yielding etc. It’s amazing that nature can play with the different formulas and still make the variety of the same jasmine fragrance.

The presence of indole in jasmie was questioned for awhile as it couldn’t be always found by analytical methods. Finally it was found that indole in jasmine flower is present in a binded form and is released after the buds are open. This process continues also after the flower is picked. That means that you can’t find free indole in the jasmine buds, but you can smell it when the flower is open. It also means, that the jasmine absolute yielded by mean of enfleurage would be the richest in indole as the flowers are releasing it for the whole 24 hours period while placed in a frame. But when extraction is applied, the flowers stop to release indole as soon as they are covered with solvent.

Phytols (phytol, isophytol and their esthers) are another interesting compounds. As benzyl alcohol, they are odourless, but found to work as fixatives in jasmne fragrance. Experienced perfumers are aware of this property and use it in their creations sometimes.

Another interesting component is a phenylacetic acid. It’s content varies from 0% to 16%. This aromachemical is also widely used in the honey accords. In a diluted form it possesses a warm honey note with animalic nuances of civet.

A spicy clove smelling eugenol (common compound of clove oil) and fresh green grass smelling cis-3-hexenol (leaf alcohol) and its ethers are also found in the jasmine absolute.

It’s also interesting to mention the presence of cresol – a compound with a chemical smell of phenol. Its ethers are used in perfumery in narcotic tropical flowers accords. There are also quinolines found in jasmine. Famous as a components of leathery accords they are also used in some floral formulations.

Well – those are another components of jasmine absolute and they all might be used in the modern jasmine formula to give nuances or to achieve desired properties. But the perfumery is an art and not the science. Perfumery didn’t follow the way of chemical reconstruction of absolute. But the were some aromachemicals made that possessed the jasmine odour but were not found in nature. Those chemicals are now used in jasmine formula next to the ones found in jasmine absolute.

2 opmerkingen:

Unknown zei

Thank you very much sir. That was useful. Iam doing a project on quality assessment of jasmine basing on fragrance. I need a help without which my project doesn't move further. Can you give list of compounds which contribute major in aroma of jasmine. I would be grateful if you share

Rushyendra Reddy zei

Thank you very much sir. That was useful. Iam doing a project on quality assessment of jasmine basing on fragrance. I need a help without which my project doesn't move further. Can you give list of compounds which contribute major in aroma of jasmine. I would be grateful if you share